In Memoriam

SMA Class of 1942
Headmaster, Commandant, Coach, Teacher, Alumnus
SMA 1950 – 1974
Deceased May 16, 2003

Colonel Edward L. "Bebo" Dodge, SMA '42

STAUNTON — Edward Lowell Dodge, of 21 Woodlee Road, died Friday (May 16, 2003) at his home. He was born Feb. 15, 1923, at Arlington, Mass., to Arthur and Charlotte (Lowell) Dodge. Prior to retirement, he was a teacher, coach, commandant, and headmaster at Staunton Military Academy, he taught for Staunton city schools, and he was an assistant principal at Shelburne Middle School.

Mr. Dodge was preceded in death by his parents; his wife, Douglas McKay (Goode) Dodge; and a sister, Mary. Survivors include two sons, Randolph Lowell Dodge of Brockton, Mass., and Steven Goode Dodge of North Andover, Mass., and a daughter, Debra Hutcheson of Orlean.

Memorial services will be at 3 p.m. Sunday at First Presbyterian Church. Burial will be private. Visitation will be after the services at the church. Hamrick Funeral Home is handling arrangements.

[Source: Staunton NewsLeader, May 17, 2003]

Honorary pallbearers are Staunton Military Academy (SMA) swim team alumni. He told his daughter that was his wish. He was SMA until the end.

HEADMASTER

The duties of the headmaster of SMA included: the scheduling of classes, guaranteeing an excellent curriculum, assigning extra study time for those who needed it, and completing college transcripts for the seniors. It was due to Colonel Dodge’s expertise and advice that SMA had such a remarkable college acceptance record.

Colonel Edward L. "Bebo" Dodge, SMA '42
Colonel Edward L. "Bebo" Dodge, SMA '42
Colonel Edward L. "Bebo" Dodge, SMA '42
Colonel Edward L. "Bebo" Dodge, SMA '42

Dear Gentlemen,
The support from SMA Alumni around the country has been overwhelming. I cannot tell you how much your thoughtfulness has meant to our family as we struggle with the loss of our father.

Sincerely,
Debra (Dodge) Hutcheson

Remembrances & Tributes

I remember Col Dodge helping me to apply to various colleges and scholarship programs during my senior year. I wasn’t the best student, but he did help me. I was accepted to Penn State on a USMC 4-year scholarship. This was mainly due to the help of Colonel Dodge. I was fortunate and lucky to meet up with Col Dodge at the SMA Alumni Association Annual Reunion in 2001, when we opened the SMA-VWIL Museum on the Hill on our former campus. I could tell how pleased he was with what the alumni of SMA had done to preserve the memory of our school and what it stood for. I’m glad he was able to see and enjoy it! A good man and SMA icon that will be sorely missed!
Truth, Duty and Honor,
Mark Orr, SMA ’73

It makes me stop and pause to reflect on someone who made a difference in my life. I will always remember a fair and honest man, ready smile and would take the time to give you the guidance you sought.
I still remember him giving me hell for not calling my parents. My mother at 83 still remembers, too.
My best to his family. Please, try and take comfort with the knowledge that your father was a special man who helped shape countless young mens lives.
God Bless you Major Dodge.
Truth, Duty and Honor,
Tony Maranino, SMA ’67

WHAT A GREAT LOSS !
Glenn Traiger, SMA ’59

My condolences to Randy and Steve and to Debra, whom I never had the plesure of meeting.
In the early 60’s, Bebo was Major Dodge, and commandant of cadets. He was a forceful figure, yet known to be extremely fair and very caring of all the corps. He affected thousands in the most positive and nuturing way.
A life well lived. It was my great pleasure to have known him.
David Lacy, SMA ’66

I recall with great affection our Bebo – he was a coach that we loved and
admired. Bebo encouraged me, a kid from overseas, and pushed me to do my best
on the field and in the pool. After graduation and college my new bride and I
ventured back to SMA and he was the first one I sought out – to introduce my
new bride to a man’s man. My deepest sympathies to his children; those directly
from his family and those of us all who grew up with him as a father figure in
his extended family. God Bless you Bebo, we shall meet again I’m sure – hold
the fort for us all and set the guard at Heavens Gate.
Jon Walker, SMA ’54

I first met “Bebo” when he was Lt. Dodge and I was a lowly rat. He was my chemistry teacher and I was, at best, an inattentive student. Then he was my swimming coach and I was, at first, a sinking swimmer. But Bebo maintained a firm hand and supportive manner, and he wrote in my first yearbook, “It was a rough run but you made it, or was it me? Coach Dodge”
Through the years, Bebo made Captain, while I continued my rough run. But with his help, I made it through science labs, made my letter in the water, and finally graduated with pride. I am also proud that we had this wonderful mentor in our formative times, and I must say, “It was, at least partly, you, Coach!”
I last talked with Bebo at the 2002 reunion. He was a bit shaky, and I thought then how we would miss him when we lost him. Well, I now realize that we will miss him, but with his profound influence on our lives, we will never really lose him.
My condolences to the Family. I know that you will miss him too.

Truth, Duty, Honor
Lawrence B. Perkins, SMA ’51

As a former member of the State Champion Swimming team, I salute Colonel Dodge and wish I could be there.
Richard D. Rosenblatt, SMA ’44

I am so old I remember him as Major Dodge. It’s a loss to the world of a man who taught the value system of being a gentleman in all situations with the correct protocol, appropriate respect, a “values and principals” system for life “on the outside.” That being the case, he will not have really passed inasmuch as his life tutorials will bear fresh fruit for each succeeding generation of SMA alumni and it is not a necessary element that the life tutorials be taught to them directly by him….his protégé’s will carry the learned behavior for the ensuing time.
Ray Jarvis, SMA ’66

I remember “Bebo” in several contexts; first as a teacher. I took Geometry with him and found him to be a particularly caring and approachable teacher. My senior year he became Commandant of Cadets and brought a sense of fairness and understanding to that office that was needed by those who had to appear before him. I appreciated this all the more when I met him at recent reunions and learned that he had also been a cadet at SMA. But my most recent memory is that of marching directly behind him last month as the OLD “old boys” left the asphalt and tried to keep cadence down the hill and onto the parade ground for the VWIL “Pass in Review” honoring SMA. I spoke to him the next evening and told him how glad I was to see him again. Little did I know.
At ease “old boy” you have left your legacy here on earth. Your final reward awaits you in the ranks of a heavenly formation. Your students and peers now commend your sprit into God’s hands.
Rich Henderson, SMA ‘ 63

He was Commandant of Cadets my senior year at SMA. He was a man of honor and strength.
We were all very proud to have be associated with him. I enjoyed sharing some old stories with him a number of years ago when I attended the All Class Reunion in Staunton…
It was wonderful to share some time with him and to have him remember me after so many years..He was one of the great ones from SMA…
George F. Dunigan, II, SMA ‘ 64

One of my first memories of SMA was Ed Dodge. He was my counselor during my three years at the Acacdemy. He, also, tried to teach me second year German. When I returned as a teacher he was my colleague, mentor and friend. I will miss him very much. He was a truly excellent man!
Waldo W. Keister, SMA ’52

I remember Colonel Dodge as a swimming coach – a very nice man.
Pete Fronizer, SMA ’54

Tony Mananino said it best when he described Major Dodge as “a fair and honest man.” He was truly special in my life. I will miss you Major Dodge. Thanks for being my friend.
Bob Poovey, SMA ’60

I remember him as Maj. Dodge, the Commandant, a man to avoid having to report to, but a helping hand otherwise.
Fred Ours, SMA ’66

I will miss this gentle man who devoted his life to teaching and coaching. I doubt he knew what a fine influence he was.
W. Duke Myers MD, SMA ’60 (First Captain)

I am very sorry to hear the news. I personally felt “Major” Dodge’s nasty paddle more than once on my behind. Back in the sixties, I think he would have been voted the baddest man in town. Like all of the other faculty and teachers, I do believe that he loved his kids and just wanted them to do the right thing. I just wish the world had more caring people like him. Thank goodness political correctness did not exist back then. The Major would have broken every rule in the book. We will all miss him very much.
TDH,
Kit Regone, SMA ’64.

Bebo was my coach on the SMA swim team 1950-51-52. More than that, he was my friend and confidant. We were in touch for several years after I graduated, but that connection drifted away over the years. I am so glad I got to see him again at the alumni reunion last June even though he was obviously in decline.
He was a fine man and one I’ll always remember with fondness and great respect.
Martin Bier, SMA ’52

I met Capt. Dodge in 1949, my first year at SMA. He took me under his wing, and always kept me out of trouble. He always called me “The Kid From Brooklyn.” My first year he taught science, and helped me through a rough year. I will always remember him as the person that influenced me the most. I am sorry that I never really thanked him for what he did for me.
To his family, your father was a very special man. Please accept my sincere condolences.
Truth, Duty, Honor
Bob Hirshman, SMA ’53

For a very short time in 1957, I tried out for the SMA Swim Team. After two weeks, Major Dodge gently recommended that I should perhaps find some other activity in which to participate. That same year, I took Chemistry under him. I know I failed. He knew I failed. But the mark was a slim “C” that just got me through. “Bebo” was a mentor and friend, guidance counselor and disciplinarian to many hundreds of cadets. There was only one Major Dodge. We at SMA were fortunate to have been taught by some of the finest faculty any school could offer. Major Dodge was at the head of that list.
C. David Litzenburg, SMA ’58

BIBO WAS A CLASS AHEAD OF ME– I THINK–WE WERE BOTH BREAST STROKERS AND COMPETITIVE WITH EACH OTHER -YES -TO THE TENTH OF A SECOND. ANYWAY, WE WERE BOTH ONE OF “LEW ONESTY’S BOYS.” I REMEMBER WE HAD JUST TAKEN THE NAVAL ACADEMY PLEBES (34-SMA-32 USNA)–WOW–WE WERE ALL IN THE LOCKER ROOM STRIPPED–LEW CAME IN WITH SOME EXTRA FOOD MONEY SMA HAD GIVEN HIM–HE HAD HAD IT CHANGED TO ONE DOLLAR BILLS (SILVER CERTIFICATES THAT IS !!!) AND GAVE EACH OF US ONE, WHICH WE WERE HOLDING AND HAD NO PLACE TO HIDE EXCEPT PERHAPS IN OUR MOUTHS. THE COACH OF THE USNA TEAM CAME IN TO CONGRATULATE US — AFTER ALL, WE WERE 14 AND 16 YEAR OLDS!! WHEN HE SAW THE MONEY, HE CAME OVER TO LEW AND SAID, “I KNEW YOU COULDN’T DO IT WITHOUT HIRING “RINGERS”– AND-YES WE WERE RINGERS!!!!! WE WORKED FOR LEW AND SMA WITH ALL OUR HEARTS AND BURSTING LUNGS…
BIBO WAS INDEED SMA TO THE VERY END—AND THE SWIM TEAM WAS HIS HEART AND SOUL–I CAN TELL YOU OTHER ANECDOTES SOME OF THEM JUST MARVELOUS–SOME OF THE BIG GUYS ON THE OTHER VARSITY TEAMS CAME UP WITH THE IDEA THAT SWIMMING SHOULD BE A MINOR LETTER==MANY OF US HAD MADE VARSITY AS FRESHMEN–14 YEAR OLDS—NEVER IN ANOTHER SPORT SUCH AS FOOTBALL-BASKETBALL-BASEBALL-BOXING OR TRACK—BUT SWIMMING YES—-SO WE WERE THE ONLY FOUR YEAR VARSITY “MEN”- AND LEW WORKED US LIKE MEN!!!!!!–LEW-BIBO-MYSELF–PAUL YOCUM-HARRY FUSSELMAN-(BEST DIVER SMA EVER HAD)- THOUGHT UP AN IDEA OF A CHALLENGE-THEM AGAINST US IN BASKETBALL–THAT IS IN 9 FEET OF WATER—————–WELL IT LASTED NOT 5 MINUTES–AND ALL THE TALK ABOUT A MINOR LETTER SANK /////// PAUL YOCUM COULD STAY UNDER WATER 2 MINUTES—- LEW ONESTY WAS “REF” AND HE DIDN’T SEE ANYTHING–SUCH AS PULLING A QUARTERBACK DOWN AND SITTING ON HIM!!!
PART OF HEAVEN IS IN THE MEMORIES OF THOSE WHO LIVE ON –IT IS THUS A CONTINUEM—-BIBO–COL DODGE TO MANY–BUT BIBO TO ME—–LIVES ON TRUTH DUTY HONOR AND ADD COUNTRY

CHARLES (CHUCK) BERMAN, SMA ’44
CO-CAPT SWIM TEAM WITH HARRY FUSSELMAN WITH WHOM WE SPEAK EACH WEEK
MEMORIES–HEAVEN–LIVES ON.

For two years I roomed in South Barracks just around the corner from Bebo and his roommate, Boyer, (the dispenser of large quantities of Lebanon bologna).
A vivid memory recalls the weekends on which Bebo practiced on his Tuba in the afternoon.
Dick Friedman, SMA ’43

I would like to extend my condolences to the Dodge Family. Though it is a time of sorrow for them,they should find joy in the fact that Colonel Dodge’s life was a life well lived. Through his life’s work he had a positive effect on the lives of many. I was one of those many. When I can to SMA, I thought,I was going to play defensive back for the N.Y. Giants. Also at SMA, I developed another career goal,”Batman of the Barracks”. It was Colonel Dodge’s guidance and paddle that made me realize, that I could not play football my entire adult life, and I better have an education to fall back, just in case I didn’t make the Giants. Also his paddle persuaded me that “Batman of the Barracks” was a bad career choice. As I reflected back almost 40 years, I can say he was right. I never did make the N.Y.Giants, and I have yet to see a job for a”Batman of the Barracks”. But I did follow his advice. I received a fine education and became a teacher/coach. I just hope when my career is over, I have had a positve effect on as many children as Colonel Dodge.
James F.Keating, SMA ’66PG

Edward Dodge was the first faculty member that I met, when my family and I visited SMA the winter before I enrolled.
He taught a course in Earth Science (more like general science) to me that fall. I’ll never forget the day when we were studying oxidation, and to explain rapid oxidation he fired a starter’s pistol. I think it woke up every one in the class, and North Barracks. His classroom was directly across from the Library. He was also the swim team coach, and if I remember correctly, we always had a great swim team.
Rest in peace, Major Dodge!
Daniel C. Caudy, SMA ’59

He was a great guy. I had him for Chemistry and I saw him when he brought the swim team to Carolina.
Lenny Beck, SMA ’57

I’m glad I wrote the letter that you published in the Kablegram. I hope he got to see it. I’ll miss him.
Dennis Kaiser, SMA ’65

This was the man that came to my house in the Cleveland,Ohio area and “pushed” SMA. After four years, I remember him well – his laughter, his teaching, his paddle. We have truly lost a Mentor.
Thomas Griffiths, SMA ’63

As a swimmer and co-captain of the swim team I have some very fond memories of one of the finest and most influential persons in my life. The trips to the Eastern Regional Championships in Chapel Hill were always filled with a lot of laughs, and Coach somehow always seemed to keep us out of trouble. To this day I am not sure how.
He will be missed by us all.
Robert T. Smith IV “Smithy”, SMA ’60

I am greatly saddened that we have lost another ‘family’ member. The legacy of our lost school becomes more removed from memory as our numbers diminish. Col. Dodge was my Headmaster, his son Steve was a fellow athlete and Debby a friend throughout my three years on the Hill. Col. Dodge exemplified the character of SMA and the lessons I have kept throughout the decades; Truth, Duty, and Honor. My best to his family.
Dave Tinker, SMA ’69